Peter Judge (Guest)

Peter Judge (Guest)

Peter Judge is the Global Editor at Datacenter Dynamics. His main interests are networking, security, mobility and cloud. You can follow Peter at: @judgecorp

Articles by Peter Judge (Guest)

AI

Where are all these AI chips coming from?

Blink, and the silicon industry changes. I thought we knew what kinds of microprocessor we needed, and the silicon chip makers were just getting on with making them faster, cheaper and better. But now, I’m seeing reports of a whole bunch of so-called “AI chips”. So what’s happening, and why?

The birth of AI chips is a strange thing, because they are not coming from the usual places: cloud providers like Google and Alibaba, telecoms firm Huawei, and tiny start-ups like GraphCore. IBM is making AI chips, after it seemed to be scaling down its silicon work. And even Intel, when it got involved, bought a start-up called Nervana, and then teamed up with Facebook.

How digitisation changed retail

We all know that “the Internet changed everything”, but sometimes we don’t realise how big those changes have been. Let’s have a look at one vertical sector: retail.

When the world wide web first put a user-friendly skin on the Internet in the early 1990s, people suddenly realised they could buy and sell things online. The actual implementation took a while: no-one had broadband, and proper security was impossible as the encryption algorithms such as RSA were classed as munitions by the US, and could not be sold. The first thing I bought online was the Perl script munitions T-shirt around 1992.

CERN - When science can't use the cloud

Demand for high performance computing (HPC) is growing fast - and you might expect it to become kind of generic. But leading research sites like CERN still make extreme demands.

Tracking down new customers...

Data center operators sometimes find it hard to get a chance to pitch to new business. So much so that they are considering extreme measures. A wholesale colocation operator admitted to a colleague at DCD how hard it is to approach hyperscale customers. There’s a limited number of them, and the decision-makers within those companies can be difficult to access. Our contact then confided that his company had seriously considered using private detectives to track down the actual people involved in buying colocation...

Location, location, location - Why some “green" data center can increase emissions

Ten years ago, there was widespread fear that data center power usage was out of control. Then, a couple of years back, fresh figures showed it was not as bad as had been feared. Big outfits like Apple, Facebook and Equinix all promised to use renewable power sources. Problem solved? Unfortunately not quite...

How the cloud took over the cables

When the cloud emerged as a concept, it referred to computer services delivered remotely. Bandwidth was cheap, and it made sense to outsource and centralise computing. Physical location, and the physical network, seemed to have become irrelevant. This has turned out not to be true...

Clean air takes fresh thinking

You might think that the issue of air purity in data centers is done and dusted, so to speak. We all know how to handle electronics, and the dust and pollutants in air are well understood. However it turns out that air contamination is a live issue and attempts to clean up other parts of the data center environment could have unintended consequences on the atmosphere inside the data center.

The edge could be a winning card for telcos

For some time now, I’ve been trying to talk more about “digital infrastructure” than “data centers”. That’s because the connections that link data centers, their users and other resources such as power, are just as important as the servers and infrastructure inside the buildings. When it comes to the 'Edge' - new, exciting opportunities could exist for telecommunications providers...

The UK's NHS will trust data to foreign powers

Data center providers will have welcomed the recent announcement that the NHS has approved the storage of patient data outside the UK . This could remove a barrier to the development of international colocation and cloud services for health and research data, and free organisations from the requirement to store patient data in their own country.

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